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research-article

Experimental and numerical investigations on the origins of rotating stall in a propeller turbine runner operating in no-load conditions

[+] Author and Article Information
Sébastien Houde

Hydraulic Machines Laboratory, Faculté des sciences et de génie, Laval University, 1341, Pavillon Adrien-Pouliot, 1065 rue de la médecine, Québec (Québec) Canada G1V 0A6
sebastien.houde@gmc.ulaval.ca

Guy Dumas

Laboratoire de Mécanique des Fluides Numérique, Faculté des sciences et de génie, Laval University, Pavillon Adrien-Pouliot, 1065 rue de la médecine, Québec (Québec) Canada G1V 0A6
guy.dumas@gmc.ulaval.ca

Claire Deschênes

Hydraulic Machines Laboratory, Faculté des sciences et de génie, Laval University, 1341, Pavillon Adrien-Pouliot, 1065 rue de la médecine, Québec (Québec) Canada G1V 0A6
claire.deschenes@gmc.ulaval.ca

1Corresponding author.

ASME doi:10.1115/1.4039713 History: Received November 01, 2017; Revised February 08, 2018

Abstract

Hydraulic turbines are more frequently used for power regulation and thus spend more time providing spinning reserve for electrical grids. Spinning reserve requires the turbine to operate at its synchronous rotation speed, ready to be linked to the grid in what is termed the speed-no-load condition. The turbine's runner flow in speed-no-load is characterized by low discharge and high swirl leading to low-frequency high amplitude pressure fluctuations potentially leading to blade damage and more maintenance downtime. For low-head hydraulic turbines operating at speed-no-load, the large pressure fluctuations in the runner are sometimes attributed to rotating stall. Using embedded pressure transducer measurements, mounted on runner blades of a model propeller turbine, and numerical flow simulations, this paper provides an insight into the inception mechanism associated with rotating stall in speed-no-load conditions. The results offer evidence that the rotating stall is in fact associated with an unstable vorticity distribution not associated with the runner blades themselves.

Copyright (c) 2018 by ASME
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