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research-article

Flow characterization of supersonic jets issuing from double-bevelled nozzles

[+] Author and Article Information
Jie Wu

Huazhong University of Science & Technology, School of Aerospace Engineering, Wuhan 430074, China
jiewu@hust.edu.cn

Haoxiang Desmond Lim

Nanyang Technological University, School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, 50 Nanyang Avenue, 639798, Singapore
hlim022@e.ntu.edu.sg

Xiaofeng Wei

Nanyang Technological University, School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, 50 Nanyang Avenue, 639798, Singapore
xwei005@e.ntu.edu.sg

T. H. New

Nanyang Technological University, School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, 50 Nanyang Avenue, 639798, Singapore
dthnew@ntu.edu.sg

Yongdong Cui

National University of Singapore, Temasek Laboratories, Engineering Drive 1, 117411, Singapore
tslcyd@nus.edu.sg

1Corresponding author.

ASME doi:10.1115/1.4040447 History: Received November 03, 2017; Revised May 27, 2018

Abstract

Supersonic jets at design Mach number of 1.45 issuing from circular 30° and 60° double-bevelled nozzles have been investigated experimentally and numerically in the present study, with a view to potentially improve mixing behaviour. Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) simulations of the double-bevelled nozzles and a benchmark non-bevelled nozzle were performed at nozzle-pressure-ratios (NPR) between 2.8 to 5.0, and the results are observed to agree well with Schlieren visualizations obtained from a modified Z-type Schlieren system. Double-bevelled nozzles are observed to produce shorter potential core lengths, modifications to the first shock cell lengths that are sensitive towards the NPR and jet half-widths that are typically wider and narrower along the trough-to-trough and peak-to-peak planes respectively. Lastly, using double-bevelled nozzles lead to significant mass flux ratios at NPR of 5.0, with a larger bevel-angle demonstrating higher entrainment levels.

Copyright (c) 2018 by ASME
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