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Research Papers: Flows in Complex Systems

A Study of the Flow Patterns Between Two Corrugated Plates With an Egg-Carton Configuration

[+] Author and Article Information
Benjamin Giron-Palomares

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Anyang Institute of Technology,
Anyang 45500, China
e-mail: tiny_ikari@yahoo.com.mx

Abel Hernandez-Guerrero

Mem. ASME
Mechanical Engineering Department,
University of Guanajuato,
Salamanca 36885,
Guanajuato, Mexico
e-mail: abel@ugto.mx

Ricardo Romero-Mendez

Facultad de Ingeniería,
Universidad Autónoma de San Luis Potosí,
Av. Dr. Manuel Nava 8,
Zona Universitaria,
San Luis Potosí 78290, Mexico
e-mail: rromerom@uaslp.mx

Qiang He

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Anyang Institute of Technology,
Anyang 45500, China
e-mail: 389975927@qq.com

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Fluids Engineering Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF FLUIDS ENGINEERING. Manuscript received May 24, 2017; final manuscript received June 18, 2018; published online July 10, 2018. Assoc. Editor: Elias Balaras.

J. Fluids Eng 141(2), 021104 (Jul 10, 2018) (13 pages) Paper No: FE-17-1296; doi: 10.1115/1.4040594 History: Received May 24, 2017; Revised June 18, 2018

Enhancing mixing in heat exchangers for low Re regimes is vital. A better mixing may be achieved by using corrugated plates. In this work, the flow patterns between corrugated plates with a novel egg-carton geometry were studied. Three-dimensional (3D) numerical models were developed for the steady laminar flow between two corrugated plates having 180 deg or 0 deg phase angles. The Reynolds number (Re ≤ 600) was defined as a function of the average distance between the corrugated plates. The numerical models were strictly developed and corroborated to achieve global convergence, local convergence, and grid-size independence. For both phase angles, it was determined that “close recirculations” decrease in size downstream and finally disappear becoming “open recirculations” due to the flow developing characteristics; the secondary flow regions were found to grow downstream; interestingly, increments on the Reynolds number favor recirculation growth and early flow detachment; the behavior and geometry of the recirculation were in line with previous flow visualization results. The recirculations were determined to be z-symmetric with respect to the channel center only for the 180 deg model. The recirculations in the 0 deg model were smaller and became “open recirculations” earlier than in the 180 deg model. Convex geometries on the transversal direction were found to favor detachment, while concave geometries inhibit it. The capability of the numerical methods to track flow paths in any direction showed a complex three-dimensional flow causing 3D-interaction among secondary flows and the main flow not reported before for these channels and just hinted by previous flow visualization studies.

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Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 2

Points monitored for local convergence at the x-wave 8 for: (a) the 180 deg and (b) the 0 deg models

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Fig. 1

Three-dimensional (3D) and two-dimensional (2D) schematic views of the heat exchanger plates considered: (a) 180 deg egg-carton corrugation and (b) 0 deg egg-carton corrugation. Havg = 30 mm, Ax = 4.5 mm, Ay = 3 mm, Λx = 83.34 mm, and Λy = 76.25 mm.

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Fig. 3

Convergence history for the 180 deg model and Re = 600: (a) scale residuals, (b) vx, (c) vy, and (d) vz

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Fig. 4

Mesh size independence study for the 180 deg model and Re = 600: (a) vx, (b) vy, (c) vz, and (d) Pi and Po

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Fig. 5

Path lines in selected x-waves for the xz-plane located at y = 2Λy by tracking: (a) 4 steps (all nodes as source points) and (b) 500 steps (few selected source points). Case of the 180 deg model and Re = 600. Main flow direction is from right to left.

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Fig. 6

x-velocity profiles for waves 1, 5, and 8 at: (a) x-wave entrance and (b) half x-wave. Re = 600, xz-plane at y = 2Λy, and the 180 deg model.

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Fig. 7

Flow visualization samples for the xz-plane located at y = 2Λy, Re = 600, and 180 deg model. Main flow direction is from right to left.

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Fig. 8

Three-dimensional view of the path for the particles being tracked on: (a) x-wave 1, 2Λy-xz-plane, and (b) x-wave 7 and 8, 2Λy-xz-plane (reverse tracking). 180 deg model, and Re = 600.

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Fig. 9

Nondimensional (a) detachment point and (b) recirculation length as a function of Reynolds number for plane A and the 180 deg model

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Fig. 10

Nondimensional (a) detachment point and (b) recirculation length as a function of Reynolds number for plane B and the 180 deg model

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Fig. 11

Convergence history for the 0 deg model and Re = 600: (a) scale residuals, (b) vx, (c) vy, and (d) vz

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Fig. 12

Mesh size independence study for the 0 deg model and Re = 600: (a) vx, (b) vy, (c) vz, and (d) Pi and Po

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Fig. 13

Path lines in selected x-waves for the xz-plane located at y = 1.5Λy by tracking: (a) 4 steps (all nodes as source points) and (b) 500 steps (few selected source points). Case of the 0 deg model, and Re = 600. Main flow direction is from right to left.

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Fig. 14

x-velocity profiles for waves 1, 5, and 8 at: (a) x-wave entrance and (b) half x-wave. Re = 600, xz-plane at y = 1.5Λy, and the 0 deg model.

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Fig. 15

Three-dimensional view of the path for the particles being tracked on x-wave 5, 1.5Λy-xz-plane (reverse tracking). Case of the 0 deg model, and Re = 600.

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Fig. 16

Flow visualization samples for the xz-plane located at y = 1.5Λy, Re = 600, and 0 deg model. Main flow direction is from right to left.

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Fig. 17

Nondimensional (a) detachment point and (b) recirculation length as a function of Reynolds number for plane B and the 0 deg model

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Fig. 18

Nondimensional (a) detachment point and (b) recirculation length as a function of Reynolds number for plane A and the 0 deg model

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