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research-article

Siting Wind Turbines near Cliffs: The Effect of Ruggedness

[+] Author and Article Information
Jerome Rowcroft

Monash University, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria 3800, Australia.
Jerome.Rowcroft@monash.edu

David Burton

Monash University, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria 3800, Australia.
David.Burton@monash.edu

Hugh M. Blackburn

Monash University, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria 3800, Australia.
Hugh.Blackburn@monash.edu

John Sheridan

Monash University, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria 3800, Australia.
John.Sheridan@monash.edu

1Corresponding author.

ASME doi:10.1115/1.4041231 History: Received December 03, 2017; Revised August 10, 2018

Abstract

Wind farms have often been located in close proximity to coastal cliffs to take advantage of the consistent wind regimes associated with many coastal regions, as well as to extract any available increase in flow speed that might be generated by such cliffs. However, coastal cliffs are often rugged as a result of erosion and the natural shape of the landform. This research explores the impact of the three-dimensional cliff topography on the wind flow. Specifically, wind tunnel testing is conducted, modelling the naturally occurring ruggedness as sawtooth lateral variations of various amplitudes applied to a forward facing step. Surface shear stress visualization techniques have been employed to derive the flow topology associated with the different topographies, while pressure probe measurements are used to measure the development of wind speed and turbulence intensity. Pressure probe measurements and surface pressure taps also assist to determine the lateral and vertical extents of the vortex structures identified. In particular, flow fields characterized by the probe measurements were consistent with vortex bursting that is described by various researchers in the flow over delta wings. Such bursting is observed as a stagnation and corresponding expansion of the vortex. Based on these observations, recommendations are provided for the siting of wind turbines near analogous cliffs.

Copyright (c) 2018 by ASME
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