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Research Papers: Flows in Complex Systems

The Effect of the Nozzle Top Lip Thickness on a Two-Dimensional Wall Jet

[+] Author and Article Information
Rory McIntyre, Eric Savory

Department of Mechanical and
Materials Engineering,
University of Western Ontario,
1151 Richmond Street,
London, ON N6A 3K7, Canada

Hao Wu

Turbulence and Energy Laboratory,
Centre for Engineering Innovation,
University of Windsor,
401 Sunset Avenue,
Windsor, ON N9B 3P4, Canada

David S.-K. Ting

Turbulence and Energy Laboratory,
Centre for Engineering Innovation,
University of Windsor,
401 Sunset Avenue,
Windsor, ON N9B 3P4, Canada
e-mail: dting@uwindsor.ca

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Fluids Engineering Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF FLUIDS ENGINEERING. Manuscript received April 23, 2018; final manuscript received September 20, 2018; published online November 16, 2018. Assoc. Editor: Devesh Ranjan.

J. Fluids Eng 141(5), 051106 (Nov 16, 2018) (9 pages) Paper No: FE-18-1287; doi: 10.1115/1.4041560 History: Received April 23, 2018; Revised September 20, 2018

The effect of the nozzle top lip thickness on a two-dimensional wall jet was examined experimentally in a wind tunnel using hot-wire anemometry. Lip thicknesses of 0.125b, 0.5b, 1b, and 2b, where b is the jet nozzle height, were considered at a Reynolds number of 30,700 based on the jet nozzle height and jet velocity. Noticeable differences in the flow profiles were observed at the jet outlet, but by 10b downstream these differences became insignificant. Different lip thicknesses resulted in different maximum velocity decay rates. The spread of the wall jet was found to be insensitive to the lip thickness.

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Figures

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Fig. 1

Elevation of wall jet wind tunnel, with details of the nozzle region and key mean velocity profile parameters (Uj is the time-averaged jet velocity, and Uc is the average co-flow velocity. In a vertical velocity profile, the maximum velocity is Um. The height where the maximum velocity occurs is ym, while the half-height ym/2 is defined as the height where the velocity is half of the maximum velocity).

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Fig. 2

Vertical profile of mean streamwise velocity: (a) x = 0, (b) x = 1b, (c) x = 2b, and (d) x = 10b

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Fig. 3

Streamwise Reynolds stress profiles: (a) x = 0, (b) x = 1b, (c) x = 2b, and (d) x = 10b

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Fig. 4

Peak streamwise Reynolds stress with respect to downstream distance

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Fig. 5

Wall-normal Reynolds stress profiles: (a) x = 0, (b) x = 1b, (c) x = 2b, and (d) x = 10b

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Fig. 6

Peak wall-normal Reynolds stress with respect to downstream distance

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Fig. 7

Reynolds shear stress profiles: (a) x = 0, (b) x = 1b, (c) x = 2b, and (d) x = 10b

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Fig. 8

Peak Reynolds shear stress with respect to downstream distance

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Fig. 9

Variation of the maximum mean streamwise velocity (Uj/Um)2 with downstream distance for t = 0.125b and B = 20b, superimposed with previous studies

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Fig. 10

The value of A with respect to Rej for t = 0.125b and B = 20b, superimposed with previous studies

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Fig. 11

Variation of (Uj/Um)2 with Rej−0.44 ((x−x0)/b) for t = 0.125b and B = 20b

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Fig. 12

(Uj/Um)2 with respect to downstream distance at t = 0.125b, 0.5b, 1b and 2b and B = 20b

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Fig. 13

(a) Structure of mixing shear layers, based on the flow visualization of Slessor et al. [19] and (b) structure of wake flow, based on the flow visualization of Taneda [20]. Note that the present flow does not contain periodicity.

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Fig. 14

Integral length scale: (a) x = 10b, (b) x = 20b, (c) x = 40b, and (d) x = 60b

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Fig. 15

Variation of the half-height with downstream distance for t = 0.125b, 0.5b, 1b and 2b and B = 20b

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