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Research Papers: Flows in Complex Systems

A Generalized Procedure for Pipeline Hydraulic Components in Quasi-Two-Dimensional Unsteady Flow Analysis

[+] Author and Article Information
Hyunjun Kim

Department of Environmental Engineering,
College of Engineering,
Pusan National University,
2, Busandaehak-ro 63 beon-gil, Geumjeong-gu,
Busan 46241, South Korea
e-mail: khj.pnu@gmail.com

Sanghyun Kim

Professor
Mem. ASME
Department of Environmental Engineering,
College of Engineering,
Pusan National University,
2, Busandaehak-ro 63 beon-gil, Geumjeong-gu,
Busan 46241, South Korea
e-mail: kimsangh@pusan.ac.kr

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Fluids Engineering Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF FLUIDS ENGINEERING. Manuscript received August 1, 2018; final manuscript received November 19, 2018; published online December 24, 2018. Assoc. Editor: Shawn Aram.

J. Fluids Eng 141(6), 061107 (Dec 24, 2018) (13 pages) Paper No: FE-18-1522; doi: 10.1115/1.4042094 History: Received August 01, 2018; Revised November 19, 2018

Quasi-two-dimensional (2D) modeling of unsteady flow is important for the accurate prediction of flow and pressure in pipeline systems. In this study, a generalized method is developed to consider various inline components such as junctions and inline valves for quasi-2D method of characteristic (MOC). The occurrence of vaporous cavitation is incorporated into the developed scheme under transient conditions. To address the discharge and pressure profile at the generalized component, a procedure is proposed to obtain the convergence satisfying the characteristic equations and hydraulic structure function. The validity of the developed method is tested for two different pipeline systems. Good agreements of transient pressure between simulations and experimental results are obtained, thus demonstrating the predictability of the developed method for junctions and inline valves with vaporous cavitation.

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References

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Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 1

Radial (a) and longitudinal (b) discretization for quasi-2D unsteady flow model where i, j, and n are indices for longitudinal, radial, and time-step discretization, respectively, rj is the radius of the jth radial cylinder, Δj is a distance between the jth and the j−1th radial cylinder, Uj and Vj are longitudinal and radial velocities at the jth radial cylinder, respectively, and C+ and C− are the positive and negative characteristic lines, respectively

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Fig. 2

Schematic of the generalized junction point on pipe network. k and w are the indices for number of connecting pipes, Ak is the kth upstream node for the flow entering the junction, and Bw is the wth downstream node for the flow leaving the junction. Pin,k is the kth inflow point at n + 1 time-step and Pout,w is the wth outflow point at n + 1 time-step.

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Fig. 3

Schematic of general component: A, B, Pinlet, and Poutlet are nodes of the system; n and n + 1 are indices of time-step; C+ and C– refer to positive and negative

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Fig. 4

Schematic diagram of experimental system by Pezzinga [8]

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Fig. 5

Comparison of the head variation between experimental result for the pipeline system from Pezzinga [8] and the numerical result from proposed model at the midlength of the pipeline

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Fig. 6

Longitudinal velocity (a) and radial flow (b) profiles for the pipeline system from Pezzinga [8] at midlength of the pipeline in 0.00 s, 0.10 s, 0.15 s, and 0.35 s after waterhammer event. R is the radius of the pipe, and U0 and Q0 are the initial mean longitudinal velocity and radial flow, respectively.

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Fig. 7

Longitudinal velocity (a) and radial flow (b) profiles for the pipeline system from Pezzinga [8] at midlength of the pipeline in 3.000 s, 3.25 s, 3.50 s, and 4.00 s after waterhammer event. R is the radius of the pipe, and U0 and Q0 are the initial mean longitudinal velocity and radial flow, respectively.

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Fig. 8

Schematic diagram (a) and picture (b) of a pipeline network for experiment

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Fig. 9

Comparison of the head variations between experimental results and predictions from the proposed general component model at upstream between 0.00 s and 3.00 s (a), those between 0.00 s and 1.00 s (b), and those between 1.00 s and 2.00 s(c)

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Fig. 10

Comparison of the head oscillation between experimental results and predictions by the proposed general component model at the downstream of inline valve

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Fig. 11

Longitudinal velocity profile at upstream (a) and downstream (b) sides of the inline valve in various time-steps. L1 and L2 are distances to the inline valve to upstream and downstream reservoirs, respectively.

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Fig. 12

Radial flow profiles at upstream (a) and downstream (b) sides of the inline valve in various time-steps. L1 and L2 are distances to the inline valve to upstream and downstream reservoirs, respectively.

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