0
research-article

Application of an intermittency model for laminar, transitional, and turbulent internal flows

[+] Author and Article Information
Dr. John P Abraham

University of St. Thomas, School of Engineering, 2115 Summit Ave, St. Paul, MN, USA 55105-1079
jpabraham@stthomas.edu

Dr. Ephraim Sparrow

University of Minnesota, Department of Mechanical Engineering, 111 Church St. SE, Minneapolis, MN, USA, 55455
esparrow@umn.edu

John M. Gorman

University of Minnesota, Department of Mechanical Engineering, 111 Church St. SE, Minneapolis, MN, USA, 55455
gorma157@umn.edu

Yu Zhao

University of Minnesota, Department of Mechanical Engineering, 111 Church St. SE, Minneapolis, MN, USA, 55455
zhao0587@umn.edu

W. J. Minkowycz

University of Illinois at Chicago, Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, 2039 ERF, 842 W. Taylor St., Chicago, IL, USA 60607
WJM@uic.edu

1Corresponding author.

ASME doi:10.1115/1.4042664 History: Received May 02, 2018; Revised January 17, 2019

Abstract

A turbulent transition model has been applied to fluid flow problems that can be laminar, turbulent, transitional, or any combination. The model is based on a single additional transport equation for turbulence intermittency. While the original model was developed for external flows, a slight modification in model constants has enabled it to be used for internal flows. It has been successfully applied to such flows for Reynolds numbers that ranged from 100 to 100,000 in circular tubes, parallel plate channels, and circular tubes with an abrupt change in diameters. The model is shown to predict fully developed friction factors for the entire range of Reynolds numbers as well as velocity profiles for both laminar and turbulent regimes.

Copyright (c) 2019 by ASME
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Tables

Errata

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In