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RESEARCH PAPERS

J. Basic Eng. 1965;87(4):811-817. doi:10.1115/1.3650823.

When determining the surface temperature on the contact of two rubbing bodies employing the widely used method offered by Block, it is assumed that the distribution of pressure in the contact area remains similar to the distribution when the heat generation caused by friction is absent. But actually, if there is even a slightly noticeable heat generation on the surfaces of the contact, a local bulging appears near the contact area owing to the heat expansion of the rubbing bodies. This bulging changes the curve and consequently the law of distribution of pressure as compared to that of Hertz. The latter in its turn leads to alteration of maximum temperatures as compared to the universally adopted values. This paper deals with the composition and then with the solution of the basic integral-differential singular equation for distribution of pressures across the contact strip for the case of two contacting cylinders with parallel axes; the distribution of surface temperature is then found.

Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Basic Eng. 1965;87(4):818-822. doi:10.1115/1.3650824.

This paper gives an analytical investigation of the hydromagnetic theory for squeeze films between two conducting surfaces. It is shown that increase in load capacity, pressure, and time of approach are possible by increasing either the strength of the magnetic field, or conductivities of the surfaces, or both.

Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Basic Eng. 1965;87(4):823-830. doi:10.1115/1.3650825.

The parallel surface thrust bearing has been studied both theoretically and experimentally. The general equations governing the laminar flow of a Newtonian fluid are presented and suitably reduced to describe the flow of lubricant through a plain collar bearing with sector pads. A computer solution of the resulting equations has been obtained in which the variations of density and viscosity with temperature are accommodated and the circumferential leakage of oil from the bearing is recognized. The resulting performance curves indicate that useful load-carrying capacities, produced by a “thermal wedge” effect, are possible with a parallel surface thrust bearing. The effect of the inlet oil temperature and bearing speed on the performance is shown. Tests were carried out on three, four, and five-pad bearings operating at 15,000 rpm. It was found that circumferential oil seals were required to insure stable operation. The results confirm that hydrodynamic lubrication may be achieved with a parallel surface thrust bearing. However, it was found that some practical limitations are imposed by high temperatures. A comparison between the theoretical load capacity of an optimum tilting pad bearing and that of a parallel surface bearing for equivalent pad dimensions, speed, and lubricant conditions revealed that the tilting pad bearing had the superior performance. Comparison of friction results with the findings of other workers shows good agreement.

Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Basic Eng. 1965;87(4):831-836. doi:10.1115/1.3650826.

The differential equations applicable to the film thickness beneath an infinitely wide, perfectly flexible self-acting tape are derived in this paper. Accurate numerical solutions are obtained for the film thickness in both the entrance and exit regions. These solutions have general applicability to situations where the entrance and exit regions are separated by a third region of uniform thickness.

Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Basic Eng. 1965;87(4):837-846. doi:10.1115/1.3650827.

Experimental results on the interior and the exit region film-thickness measurements of self-acting foil bearings are presented and discussed. These measurements were made with capacitive sensors and conductive foils. The measured and predicted values agree very well within the range of nondimensional parameters, h0 /R, from 10−4 to 10−3 and, T/μU, from 105 to 106 . The agreement deviates for values beyond these ranges. Empirical expressions for predicting the constant and minimum film thickness applicable beyond these ranges are also presented. They are valid within the range of h0 /R from 5(10)−5 to 10−2 and T/μU from 104 to 105 . Growing sinusoidal film thickness in the exit region was also observed, measured, and checked with theoretical predictions.

Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Basic Eng. 1965;87(4):847-849. doi:10.1115/1.3650828.

The torque due to the lubricant, and acting on a journal in a short cylindrical bearing, is derived in the special, and particularly simple, case of a journal whirling and rocking in the neighborhood of its steady-state position under load. The results of the investigation have a bearing in the study of the damping of forced vibrations and of the development of self-excited oscillations of rotors.

Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Basic Eng. 1965;87(4):850-856. doi:10.1115/1.3650829.

The plastic strain-life relation for several ductile materials is examined in both air and vacuum and interpreted in light of the well-known plastic strain (ΔξP ) life (N) relation, N1/2 ΔξP = constant. These data indicate that the relation applies as well in vacuum as in air and, in certain cases, better and to a much larger number of cycles. Further experiments are described in which these materials are repeatedly fractured and rejoined in vacuum, exhibiting a very substantial capacity for vacuum cold reweldment of completely fractured specimens.

Topics: Fatigue , Vacuum , Cycles
Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Basic Eng. 1965;87(4):857-864. doi:10.1115/1.3650830.

Previous investigations of frequency on fatigue strength are briefly reviewed in this paper. New resonant-type push-pull fatigue testing machines at 50 and 100 kc/s were also developed by using a ferrite magnetostrictive vibrator. By using these machines, as well as previously developed high and low-frequency push-pull fatigue testing machines, the influence of stress frequency on fatigue limit of two carbon steels was determined at frequencies ranging from 40 to 100,000 c/s. The fatigue limit was found to increase monotonically with increasing frequency. No peak in the value of the fatigue limit was observed at frequencies up to 100,000 c/s.

Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Basic Eng. 1965;87(4):865-870. doi:10.1115/1.3650831.

A large prompt-burst nuclear reactor, “Super Kukla,” required a core of material that would withstand unusually high stress levels resulting from rapid thermal expansion and inertia loads. An experimental investigation was undertaken to determine the properties of cast uranium—10 wt percent molybdenum alloy under static and dynamic conditions of loading at various temperatures for application in this reactor. Techniques were developed to cast, inspect by radiographic and ultrasonic means, machine, and nickel plate the material. Castings are in the form of rings, 30 in. OD, 18 in. ID, and 2 in. thick. Sound material with carbon content of less than 250 ppm was found to have a static yield strength of approximately 130,000 psi, ultimate strength of 133,000 psi, and elongation of 10 percent at room temperature. Sustained static loads of more than 40,000 psi in a normal atmosphere were found to induce a brittle fracture attributed to stress corrosion. Test specimens subjected to strain rates on the order of 20 in/in/sec withstood stresses of 200,000 psi in the gage region, but usually failed in the threaded ends.

Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Basic Eng. 1965;87(4):871-874. doi:10.1115/1.3650832.

An analytical model has been developed which shows that the fracture of surface hardened components initiates at the subsurface interface because of the triaxial stress-state developed at this location.

Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Basic Eng. 1965;87(4):875-878. doi:10.1115/1.3650833.

The prediction of rupture life of several high temperature alloys (Hastelloy X, Type 316 stainless steel, Cb-1 Zr) was investigated analytically and experimentally for the case of linearly increasing stress.

Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Basic Eng. 1965;87(4):879-884. doi:10.1115/1.3650834.

The problem treated in this paper is the following: If the strength of a member is reduced a certain amount by the presence of a single hole (or cavity), how close can a second hole (or cavity) be located relative to the first one without causing appreciable further reduction of the strength of the member? This problem arises in evaluating the results of nondestructive tests (x-ray, ultrasonic) of welds, forgings, and castings with regard to inclusions and porosity [1]. The available results for elastic stress distributions are reviewed; some estimates are made for examples for which solutions are not available. A complete solution of this problem must consider inelastic behavior and failure. In the absence of the needed information, it is believed that some guidance can be obtained from a comparison of elastic solutions, since we are concerned here with ratios (i.e., comparisons between one and two holes) rather than absolute strength determinations.

Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Basic Eng. 1965;87(4):887-893. doi:10.1115/1.3650838.

Radiographic acceptance standards, such as those found in the ASME Unfired Pressure Vessel Code are critically reviewed. Limits on the size and distribution of porosity in steel welds are analyzed from the viewpoint of susceptibility to failure in service. In large part, present standards for porosity appear to have been established on a “good workmanship” basis rather than on setting sound conservative limits for the maximum size, and distribution of flaws which can be tolerated without decreasing the reliability of the product. Radiographic acceptance standards in use today do not reflect the significant advances being made in (1) the fracture mechanics approach to designing for prevention of failure; (2) theoretical studies of the stress-concentration effects of holes in close proximity to one another; and (3) the possible use of complementary nondestructive testing techniques. Considerable emphasis is placed on the proposition that radiographic acceptance standards for weldments must be designed specifically for each particular application. Considerations applicable to welds in the 120-in-dia rocket motor case are cited as an example of how standards for acceptable porosity and inclusions can be established.

Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Basic Eng. 1965;87(4):894-898. doi:10.1115/1.3650839.

A simple approach is given for the analysis of stress and strain in curved bars when the tangential stress and strain are related by Neuber’s law.

Topics: Stress
Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Basic Eng. 1965;87(4):899-903. doi:10.1115/1.3650840.

A method is developed for estimating deflections in beams subjected to creep bending. Many structures which require lengthy calculations when solved by conventional methods can be analyzed easily by the present procedure. The method is illustrated by a series of examples. Both statically determinate and indeterminate cases are considered.

Topics: Creep , Deflection
Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Basic Eng. 1965;87(4):904-916. doi:10.1115/1.3650841.

The plane-strain fracture toughness of precipitation-hardening aluminum alloys of 7000 and 2000 series and a strain-hardening alloy 5456 have been determined at both room temperature and −320 F using circumferentially notched rounds. These results show that the plane-strain fracture toughness is an inverse function of the yield strength and that at equivalent yield-strength levels the 7000 series of alloys is tougher than the 2000 series of alloys. Plane strain-fracture toughness values were determined using “pop-in” technique employing both the center crack and single-edge-notch specimens. Comparable values were obtained in all examples tested. The effects of impurity elements, iron and silicon, on the fracture toughness of 7075-T6 aluminum alloy were investigated using a special low iron-and-silicon melt of 7075-T6 material. Reduction of these impurity elements resulted in a 30 to 45 percent upgrading of the plane-strain fracture toughness of this alloy. These data have been interpreted in terms of the process zone size, dT , using electron microfractography as an indication of this parameter. The plane strain-fracture toughness values have been used to calculate the breaking stress of part-through-cracked panel. These calculations have been confirmed experimentally for two alloys. Such data have direct applicability in the design of structures.

Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Basic Eng. 1965;87(4):917-924. doi:10.1115/1.3650844.

The nature and inception of pressure and flow-rate oscillations associated with a high-speed cavitating inducer have been investigated by nonlinear analog computer simulation. The favorable accord between simulation findings and typical actual dynamic oscillation characteristics validates the general technique for extension into inducer design analyses. The nature and behavior of the cavitation vapor volume and the dynamic response characteristics of the complete fluid circuit play key roles in the incidence and suppression of oscillations.

Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Basic Eng. 1965;87(4):925-931. doi:10.1115/1.3650845.

A condition of resonance in a large hydroelectric development is analyzed and the reasons the plant vibrated at selected frequencies and with definite pressure and discharge amplitudes are explained. The impedance theory is used in the analysis. The complete system is programmed for solution on the digital computer using the method of characteristics and the resonating conditions are reproduced as they actually occurred.

Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Basic Eng. 1965;87(4):932-939. doi:10.1115/1.3650846.

Several design models of centrifugal pump impellers were tested in water to determine tip-clearance effects on noncavitating and cavitating performance. Although most of these impellers were designed without tip shrouds, three direct comparisons for shrouded versus unshrouded models are included. Within the scope of this investigation, varying degrees of tip clearance produced dissimilar trends in the hydraulic performance for the different design models tested. Fully shrouded impellers consistently yielded inferior cavitation performance as compared to unshrouded versions.

Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Basic Eng. 1965;87(4):941-952. doi:10.1115/1.3650849.

The flow over a body of revolution and its stabilizing surfaces, at an angle of attack, was studied experimentally in order to obtain a better understanding of the real-flow effects as well as the interference effects between components of the configuration. The velocity field about the configuration, the surface flow, and the pressure distribution were obtained with the model mounted in the wind tunnel of the Ordnance Research Laboratory. Analysis of the data showed there is an increase in lift on the body and a decrease in lift on the stabilizing surfaces from that of the isolated components at the same incidence to the flow. The interference effects between components is evidenced by the surface flows and pressure distributions as well as the vorticity distribution calulated from the measured velocity field. The decreased lift on the stabilizing surfaces is clearly related to the flow over the after part of the body.

Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Basic Eng. 1965;87(4):953-959. doi:10.1115/1.3650850.

Results are presented of theoretical and experimental studies of the pressure peaks occurring in valve-controlled hydraulic actuators operated under severe loading conditions. Oil compressibility is shown to reduce the magnitude of these peaks. Valve overlap has the opposite effect. The possibilities of fatigue failure and cavitation damage in the actuator are discussed. The two different modes of cavity formation which occur when the valve is oscillated sinusoidally are discussed in detail.

Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Basic Eng. 1965;87(4):960-966. doi:10.1115/1.3650851.

The primary objective of this paper is to present a method of determining the resonant characteristics of a number of practical hydraulic systems. Distributed parameters are used to describe the system with the concept of hydraulic impedance being used to determine the frequency response. The investigation shows that the impedance approach is a valid, practical method of evaluating the resonant characteristics of complex systems without the introduction of many simplifying assumptions in the system geometry.

Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Basic Eng. 1965;87(4):967-976. doi:10.1115/1.3650852.

With a view to clarifying cavitation phenomena induced by ultrasonic waves, utilized recently in erosion tests, the frequency spectrum of the waves caused by cavitation was obtained, and the pattern of air bubbles produced were observed by high-speed photography. Some considerations also are given in the present report on the amount and form of erosion caused by cavitation.

Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Basic Eng. 1965;87(4):977-985. doi:10.1115/1.3650853.

Collapse of a spherical bubble in a compressible liquid, including the effects of surface tension, viscosity, and an adiabatic compression of gas within the bubble is investigated by numerical solutions of the hydrodynamic equations. A limiting value of shear viscosity causes the bubble collapse to slow down markedly, for both compressible and incompressible liquids, whereas moderate viscosities have very little effect on the rate of collapse. The inclusion of surface tension and viscosity introduces two scaling parameters into the solution, so that a single normalized solution is no longer sufficient to describe collapse behavior. The magnitude of the density changes calculated for the compressible liquid and the extremely rapid changes with time suggest that the usual Navier-Stokes equation of motion may not be appropriate. The possibility of liquid relaxational phenomenon and its contribution to sonoluminescence is considered. Shock waves or damagingly high pressures are not generated during collapse at a distance in the liquid equal to the initial radius from the center of collapse, although they will appear at such a distance if the bubble rebounds.

Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Basic Eng. 1965;87(4):986-990. doi:10.1115/1.3650854.

An axisymmetrical gas foil bearing is analyzed, with the foil being treated as a thin plate bent into a cylindrical shape. Symmetrically placed, circumferential, constant pressure sources supply the lubricant.

Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Basic Eng. 1965;87(4):991-1005. doi:10.1115/1.3650855.

A unified, systematic survey of the recent developments of bubble dynamics is presented with the emphasis on its analytical aspects. A general formulation of the problem is established first; then it is shown how simplifications may result from the spherical symmetry of the system and the assumption of uniform interior of the bubble. Two classes of problems of physical interest are treated subsequently; namely, the growth and collapse of a bubble, and the bubble in oscillation. In the first category, various aspects of the problem are investigated depending on whether the inertial, the thermal, or the diffusive effect is the dominating controlling factor of the motion. In the second category, the nonlinear mechanical oscillations are discussed, as well as the linear oscillations with thermal and diffusive interactions. The paper concludes with a study of the stability of the spherical symmetry of the flow system.

Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Basic Eng. 1965;87(4):1006-1010. doi:10.1115/1.3650791.

The problem of a two-dimensional cavity flow of an ideal fluid with small unsteady disturbances in a gravity free field is considered. By regarding the unsteady motion as a small-perturbation of an established steady cavity flow, a fundamental formulation of the problem is presented. It is shown that the unsteady disturbance generates a surface wave propagating downstream along the free cavity boundary, much in the same way as the classical gravity waves in water, only with the centrifugal acceleration owing to the curvature of the streamlines in the basic flow playing the role of an equivalent gravity effect. As a particularly simple example, the surface waves in a hollow potential vortex flow is calculated using the present theory.

Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Basic Eng. 1965;87(4):1011-1017. doi:10.1115/1.3650792.

A transient flow analysis of a longitudinal vibration in a liquid rocket engine propellent feed system and its supporting structural framework is described, together with supporting experimental tests. Nonlinear friction losses are used in the partial differential equations of continuity and momentum describing the unsteady flow. These equations are solved by the methods of characteristics and placed in form suitable for digital computation. The turbopump steady-state characteristic curves are used to find the transient pressure rise across the pump, and the effects of pump inlet cavitation are estimated from experimental data.

Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Basic Eng. 1965;87(4):1018-1024. doi:10.1115/1.3650793.

An analysis has been performed to determine the velocity and pressure-drop characteristics of moderately rarefied gas flows in rectangular and annular ducts. The density level is such that a velocity slip may occur at the duct walls. In general, it is found that the effect of slip is to flatten the velocity distribution relative to that for a continuum flow; furthermore, the axial pressure gradient is diminished under slip-flow conditions. The conditions characterizing the onset of the slip regime have been determined on the basis of a 2 percent reduction in friction factor relative to the continuum value. For all the geometries studied here, the onset of slip occurred at a Knudsen number of 0.003. The effect of compressibility on the axial pressure drop was also investigated. It was found that compressibility increases the pressure drop primarily through an increase in viscous shear rather than through an increase in momentum flux.

Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Basic Eng. 1965;87(4):1025-1027. doi:10.1115/1.3650794.

Measurement of low mass-flow rates was readily accomplished by development of two similar flowmetering assemblies. Each assembly consisted of five 0.016 to 0.070-in. diameter critical-flow nozzles and individual control valves connected between common inlet and exit manifolds. Mass-flow rates through each nozzle were determined over a range of upstream pressure and temperature. The probable deviations in the measured data are approximately ≠0.83 percent. Discharge coefficients were calculated from the calibration results using the well-known one-dimensional critical-flow equation. An average error of ≠2.5 percent in the discharge coefficient is possible because of the difficulty in determining true throat areas of these small-sized nozzles.

Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Basic Eng. 1965;87(4):1029-1040. doi:10.1115/1.3650798.

This paper describes the results of an ASME sponsored research program on the measurement of high pressure-high temperature steam and water flows. Results obtained during tests at three central stations, a steam and water laboratory, and three hydraulic laboratories are described. It was determined that coefficients of ASME orifices or nozzles are within a tolerance of 1 percent of ASME coefficients providing that the beta ratios were limited to a maximum of 0.60 for nozzles and 0.65 for orifices and that materials are selected so that the surfaces remain in an essentially as new condition, and frequent inspections are made to verify surface and cleanliness.

Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Basic Eng. 1965;87(4):1043-1051. doi:10.1115/1.3650802.

A simplified analysis of the density effect and the Reynolds-number effect on the performance of a gas turbine flowmeter is presented. The analysis indicates a simple method to determine numerically both the density effect and the Reynolds-number effect by a single calibration of the meter in a convenient gas (air) at any convenient pressure and temperature. Results of the analysis are used to predict meter performance in other gases under other operating conditions. A 6-in. gas turbine meter is used to illustrate the practical application of the analysis.

Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Basic Eng. 1965;87(4):1058-1062. doi:10.1115/1.3650807.

This paper describes the recently developed thrust-measurement technique, a quasi-primary method, that is capable of calibrating very large ASME nozzles. The technique is an application of Newton’s law, force equals mass-flow rate times velocity. Application of boundary-layer theory allows the flow coefficient to be calculated from the thrust force, area, and pressure measurements. Test data indicate that the flow coefficient of ASME nozzles flowing compressible gas at high pressure ratio increases with throat diameter, independent of Reynolds number, and is about 1/2 percent lower than the coefficient for incompressible fluid at the same Reynolds number. This thrust-measurement technique has been used successfully to prove the thrust-measurement capability of many aircraft-jet nozzle test facilities.

Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Basic Eng. 1965;87(4):1063-1071. doi:10.1115/1.3650808.

This paper covers the design and the operational and performance characteristics of a precision pressure generation system utilizing a controlled-clearance type of piston gage. Programmed computer outputs for generating precise pressures automatically in increments smaller than 1 psi over the entire system range have been used to eliminate computational requirements and to generate a large number of pressures rapidly. Piston fall rates have been controlled using constantly varying jacket pressures to maintain sensitivity and flotation requirements, and to keep wear down to a minimum. Experience regarding constancy of pressure output over a period of three years is covered. The amount of actual time in use for the system is well over a thousand hr.

Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Basic Eng. 1965;87(4):1072-1077. doi:10.1115/1.3650809.

The stress-displacement problem is considered for a typical bourdon tube in equilibrium deflection resulting from internal fluid pressure. In contrast with many analyses using approximations and simplifications, here the exact (linear) elastic-shell theory is employed, applied to a tube having elliptical cross section and with central line forming a circular arc. Differential-geometry quantities for the surface are derived as required for shell theory, and the explicit form is obtained for the partial differential equations, referenced to the lines of principal curvature as orthogonal curvilinear coordinates. Equations are presented for the Love-type shell theory and for a Donnell-type theory, both including the interacting bending and membrane effects. The rigid plug at the free end of a bourdon tube creates some complexity in the boundary conditions: These must be considered in-the-large rather than at each boundary point, to obtain the correct number of imposed relations for a determinate problem. The original problem is finally reduced to a specific computational problem for five partial differential equations of order eight, plus certain integral boundary relations, in a rectangular domain.

Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster

DISCUSSIONS

Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster

ERRATA

Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster

TECHNICAL BRIEFS

J. Basic Eng. 1965;87(4):1079-1080. doi:10.1115/1.3650811.
Abstract
Topics: Boundary layers
Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Basic Eng. 1965;87(4):1080-1081. doi:10.1115/1.3650812.
Abstract
Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Basic Eng. 1965;87(4):1081-1082. doi:10.1115/1.3650813.

A minimum principle from hydrodynamics is applied to the one-dimensional plane slider bearing which is provided with a self-seeking pivot mechanism. An analysis was made in which a certain integral was minimized subject to the constraint that the load, speed, and viscosity were held fixed. This analysis showed that this corresponded exactly to that combination of minimum film thickness and inclination which would minimize the power loss subject to the above-mentioned constraint. It was also found that, in order to satisfy the minimum principle, there exists a definite numerical ratio between the slider inclination and the nondimensional minimum film thickness. This, in turn, fixed the pivot location relative to the length of the slider.

Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Basic Eng. 1965;87(4):1082-1083. doi:10.1115/1.3650814.
Abstract
Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Basic Eng. 1965;87(4):1083-1085. doi:10.1115/1.3650815.

The investigated case is: Two rotating steel cylinders, infinitely long and with effective radius of curvature of 5 cm, are loaded to Hertzian pressure of approximately 5000 kg/cm2 and are lubricated by an oil. The composite effect of peripheral speed and viscosity (under a given surface temperature) is necessary to build up a lubricating film with a thickness of 1 micron. The solution is approximate and found by the use of elastohydrodynamic theory.

Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Basic Eng. 1965;87(4):1085-1086. doi:10.1115/1.3650816.

The only exact solution for the infinitely long, gas-lubricated slider bearing is the one obtained by Harrison [1] for the plane wedge isothermal film. The resultant formulas for the pressure distribution and load-carrying capacity are complicated and therefore quite cumbersome in numerical design calculations. In the analysis to follow, a simplified, approximate solution is developed which can be applied to any infinitely long slider geometry.

Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Basic Eng. 1965;87(4):1087-1089. doi:10.1115/1.3650817.
Abstract
Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Basic Eng. 1965;87(4):1089. doi:10.1115/1.3650818.
Abstract
Topics: Pressure , Fluids
Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster

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